About Michael

Michael studied physics and creative writing at Stanford University with additional training in finance and management at the Stanford Business School Executive Program. He has worked with companies ranging from FedEx, Boeing and GE to Microsoft, Pfizer and American Express, as well as both NASA and the Department of Defense.

He addresses groups ranging from venture capitalists and corporate executives to educators, students and the general public and is also a regular guest on radio and television, including Good Morning America, the Today Show, PBS, CNN and the History Channel. A dynamic speaker who delivers an entertaining and common-sense vision of change for business and individuals, Michael blends technology, economics, demographics, culture and human nature.

  • “I’ve heard nothing but positive feedback on your presentation. Everyone found it both educational and entertaining. You definitely hit on key points for the attendees with regards to technology and I would highly recommend you to other groups who are looking for forward-thinking speakers.”
    National Retail Federation
  • “I wanted to let you know that you did an outstanding job of moderating. You pivoted nicely from panelist to panelist and from topic to topic, all the while, keeping with the themes of the conference.”
    Chubb Group
  • “Your knowledge, expertise, insights and charisma educated our audience and stimulated us to think about where we could be in the near future.”
  • “Many of the delegates mentioned that your session was the most informative of the program—they especially appreciated your warmth and wit. We were very pleased that your remarks were so carefully tailored for our audience, and that you delivered exactly the message we had planned.”
    National Association of Federal Credit Unions

Michael began his career as a writer for Rolling Stone and went on to co-found Outside magazine. He then launched Newsweek’s technology column, winning numerous journalism awards, including a National Headliner Award for coverage of the Chernobyl meltdown.

For ten years he was vice president of The Washington Post Company's new media division, guiding both the newspaper and its sister publication Newsweek into the new century, as well as serving as editor and general manager of Newsweek.com where he won the Distinguished Online Service award from the National Press Club for coverage of 9/11.

His work in interactive media ranges from early ground-breaking projects for LucasFilm and Apple to dozens of Internet ventures. He has received patents for multimedia storytelling techniques, and is listed in Who’s Who in Science and Engineering. In 2007 he was named to the Magazine Industry Digital Hall of Fame, and in 2009 he received the World Technology Network Award for Lifetime Achievement in Media and Journalism.

Rogers recently completed two years as futurist-in-residence for The New York Times and is a columnist for NBC.com. He is also a best-selling novelist whose fiction explores the human impact of technology. He lives in New York City where he works on book and television projects.